Profiles in Liberty - Dr. Mahmoud Ahmadinejad

The son of a blacksmith, Ahmadinejad entered into this world into a state of humility.  Born in the small village of Aradan in 1956, his family had to travel to Tehran in search of riches.

In 1976 Ahmadinejad enrolled into the Iran University of Science and Technology aas an undergraduate of civil engineering.  He was accepted to a Master of Science program and received his doctorate in 1987.  He would stay at the facility as a faculty member giving back to the students, as a teacher and lecturer.

After the Islamic Revolution he became a member of the Office for Strengthening Unity, an organization developed to prevent students from allying with the Mojahedin-e Khalq (a terrorist organization that promotes the overthrow of Iran’s current government).  After the United Stated backed Iraqi invasion of Iran, Ahmadinejad joined the Army of the Guardians of the Islamic Revolution and served in their intelligence and security departments.

During all of this Ahmadinejad met and married his wife, having two sons and one daughter.

He made a name for himself in politics as being an ultra conservative mayor, reversing many liberal changes of the previous administrations.  Such as seperating men and women (which is still an accepted Muslim practice) and honoring war veterans of the Iran-Iraq War by burying them in the major city squares of Tehran.  These conservative values as well as his emphasis on charity (distributing food to the many poor on Tehran’s streets) led to his vast popularity.

A dark horse in the presidential election campaign, he promoted the many conservative reforms he’d made as Mayor of Tehran.  His campaign motto that translates simply, “It’s doable and we can do it.”  Attracted both religious conservatives and the lower economic classes.

Taking a populist approach, with emphasis on his own modest life, he often made comparisons to the popular second President of Iran, Mohammad Ali Rajai.  Often stating that he planned to create an “exemplary government for the people of the world” in Iran.  Illustrating founding father principals of the United States in his city on a hill example.  Leading through attraction not promotion.

Often referring to himself as a principlist in his actions.  One of his main goals has been “putting the petroleum income (of Iran) on people’s tables”.  Creating a redristubution of wealth effort to distribute Iran’s oil profits amongst the poor.

He is, indeed, very outspoken concerning Iran’s future relations with the United States.  In an interview with the Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting a few days before being elected president he stated, quite frankly, that the United Nations was “one-sided, stacked against the world of Islam.”  He has openly opposed the veto power given to the five permanent members of the UN Security Council and in the same interview stated that, “It is not just for a few states to sit and veto global approvals.  Should such a privilege continue to exist, the Muslim world with a population of nearly 1.5 billion should be extended the same privilege.”  Seemingly speaking treason to the United Nations by simply wanting a world voice.  He has defended Iran’s nuclear program and has stated that, “a few arrogant powers” attempt to limit Iran’s industrial and technological development in this and other fields.

Also during his campaign Ahmadinejad stated, “We didn’t participate in the revolution for turn-by-turn government…This revolution tries to reach a world-wide government.”  Also mentioning that he has an extended program on fighting terrorism in order to improve foreign relations and has called for greater ties with Iran’s neighbors and ending visa requirements between states in the region, stating that, “people should visit anywhere they wish, freely.”

5 Responses to “Profiles in Liberty - Dr. Mahmoud Ahmadinejad”

  1. [...] Ian A. wrote an interesting post today onHere’s a quick excerpt The son of a blacksmith, Ahmadinejad entered into this world into a state of humility.  Born in the small village of Aradan in 1956, his family had to travel to Tehran in search of riches. In 1976 Ahmadinejad enrolled into the Iran University of Science and Technology aas an undergraduate of civil engineering.  He was accepted to a Master of Science program and received his doctorate in 1987.  He would stay at the facility as a faculty member giving back to the students, as a teacher and lec [...]

  2. I always figgured Ahmadinejad isn’t the horrible monster that our governments propaganda portrays him to be. In interviews I’ve seen with him, he seems calm, collected and intelligent. However, the fact that he says he wants to “wipe Israel off the face of the map”, leads me to believe perhaps some of his values in liberty are not exactly on par with what ours are. The Israeli/muslim conflict is at the heart of many problems we face in this world. Some of his rhetoric does exactly the opposite of what needs to be said to heal the wounds created from this religious struggle.

  3. In response to the , “wipe Israel off the face of the map” statement, he’s never said that. He’s also never stated that the holocaust did not happen. He has suggested that the holocaust could be better understood if investigated properly and that the region would be more stable if Israel would be removed from the equation.

  4. Well that’s what I get for trusting news main stream news outlets

  5. He’s a non-libertarian leader of a state–therefore, he is contemptible.

    (i.e. The only good politicians are those who do everything in their power to undermine the state. As he does not do this, he should be held in contempt rather than praised as a “Profile in Liberty.”)

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